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"CAPTAIN BILLY’S MAGIC 8 BALL" - A New Series Created By William Mesnik, The Mind Behind “Mesmerized”- EPISODE # 9 - "QUESTIONING MY SEXUALITY" - FEATURING THE ALBUM "THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS" By David Bowie

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“CAPTAIN BILLY’S MAGIC 8 BALL” – A New Series Created By William Mesnik, The Mind Behind “Mesmerized”- EPISODE # 9 – “QUESTIONING MY SEXUALITY” – FEATURING THE ALBUM “THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS” By David Bowie RCA 1972 IN HIGH DEFINITION WITH NARRATIVE BY CAPTAIN BILLY

EPISODE #9 THE RISE AND FALL OF ZIGGY STARDUST AND THE SPIDERS FROM MARS IN HIGH DEFINITION - By David Bowie (RCA, 1972)

QUESTIONING MY SEXUALITY

In 1948 Alfred Kinsey published his study of sexual behavior in the human male, which postulated that no human is exclusively hetero- or homosexual. There is a continuum of sexual identification, and most people fall somewhere in the middle. In 1972 I hadn’t heard of Kinsey, but I was digging on David Bowie immensely, and if loving him was a litmus test for sexual proclivity, color me fluid! I was cozying up to Bowie, and I never questioned my devotion’s orientation. The “Glam” movement, which he heralded, testified to a whole generation of experimenting deviants and mutants.

One prior album cover featured Bowie wearing a dress, posing on a chaise-lounge; in another he appeared glamorously airbrushed, like a modern day Marlene Dietrich. On Ziggy Stardust, where concept, identity, and the music came together, the Thin White Duke had transcended mere gender, morphing himself into an alien visitor from another planet — arriving to save the planet earth from the apocalypse. Prancing around in mylar jumpsuits with spiky orange hair, he inspired androgynous, inter-stellar, erotic dreams.

The music was just too dynamic to ignore. Influenced by Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, and T-Rex. Suffragette City barrels like a freight train; Rock n Roll Suicide conjures up a Weimar Republic Music Hall; Moonage Daydream builds to a swollen, orgasmic tide; Five Years states its ominous doo-wop alarum with blunt force, inflicting serious trauma. Bowie unequivocally stakes his claim to Rock n Roll greatness with this record, and succeeds brilliantly.

When David Jones, aka Bowie died in 2016, the musical world lost one of its true originals, an inexhaustibly resourceful artist, who never quit searching for his lost chord. Blackstar, his last recording, prepared in anticipation of his impending demise, contains the line: “Look up here, I’m in heaven…” The record became a posthumous smash, proving that not only did Bowie transcend sexuality, but that he also gave death a run for its money.


By Rich Buckland 05/09/2021 04:08 PM

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